Yoroï Shibari

“Shibari” is Japanese, meaning ‘to tie up’. Little by little in Japan, and now in Europe, shibari has become a multifaceted art form otherwise known as ‘kibanku’. ‘Kibanku’ is the art of tying someone up with ropes whilst ‘shibari’ is the act of tying.
The art form combines sensuality, physicality and emotion. It aims to be both aesthetically pleasing and to act as a vehicle allowing the other to undertake an inner journey of release, of letting go. I invite you to come and share my passion for rope and learn about my way of life. Shibari is a unique art form and a tool for personal development. I am interested in the process of creation rather than in just the end result itself, and this journey is reflected in my study and life’s work. As such, I call my art work Kibanku-Do.
My particular approach is complimented by my studies in martial arts and intimately linked with my passion for Japan, a country in which I lived for 4 years. My 15 years worth of experience as an Aikido practitioner combined with my love of kibanku have enabled me to create my personal approach to Kibanku. Following 6 years now of daily practice, I continue to be fascinated and humbled by the subtleties of this art.

In order to share this knowledge, my team and I put on events, meet ups and stand-alone projects such as:
Classes (technical or research), Performances, Specific Kibanku study, Open or private sessions …

Japanese armour is world apart from European armour; it is designed to scare rather than to protect. There is a discrepancy between what it is meant to do and the image it portrays. Furthermore, its use merits great study; armour alters how the body moves, however Japanese armour permits a great deal of physical movement, much more so than European armour. For example, it is possible to swim in Japanese armour.

For me, rope has many similarities with this understanding of Japanese armour, literally and conceptually, by altering the way the body can move and by providing an alternative reality for the body, leaving the imagination free to explore. Equally, the visual effect of my work in rope does not necessarily reveal the experience shared between myself and the person I tie.

The further one delves into the world of rope, the more one understands that not only the practitioner, but also the person being tied must be equally well trained. It takes two; the person being tied is not a blank, nor can one rely entirely on technique. It is a union, participatory and collaborative. In this sense, and inspired by my early training in Aikido, my style of Kibanku is a method of communication, working on numerous levels, just like Japanese armour.

Contact Us